SQUARE - ANIMATION TO WEAR

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SQUARE - ANIMATION TO WEAR is the interdisciplinary master thesis of Marc Oßwald and Miriam Leah Hess at Masterstudio Design HGK Basel. The project is dealing with the strategies of design and creation as well as different design processes of two- and three-dimensional media, with the aim to break the borders between them. The entire project is about animation, film and photography as well as fabrics, the body and space. The basic idea of this work is the combination and collaboration of the disciplines visual communication and fashion in order to cause influence on each other. The two disciplines should not only be added but mixed during the process of the project and should furthermore bring out new experimental techniques of unconventional us the two- and three-dimensional media. therefore we were developing a method of animating cubic shapes by bringing a projection of a square in motion through tulle and a flexible bent paper. one sequence resulting from this design method for animating shapes with the duration of 2 seconds was chosen as a pattern for a further unconventional design method for creating a dress. every single frame of this animation is used as a pattern to build a gown made of fifty layers which are the translation to the fifty single frames of the animation. Thus the animation became a wearable piece of cloth. 

To present this process of an animated square to a dress we developed a performative installation of thirty meters length. therefore we were using 10 projectors and 150m tulle and realised a parkour of seven different stations. The visitor is led through the exhibition by projection and sound. this work was shown first in July 2011 at Ausstellungsraum Klingental Basel and at the HGK Basel Diploma Exhibition in September 2011.

We had ten players for the films and two for the sound. These machines were synchronized by another quite nostalgic thing called "bakunin". You have to program a master and define the slaves, which are running in an endless loop and triggering each player.To synchronize the projected films we decided to  use a very old fashioned but good working method for video installations.  We had ten players for the films and two for the sound.